General

Sometimes the words don’t matter

If you’ve followed this blog for any length of time you know that I talk a lot about speaking in public and how powerful it can be in a host of ways. Most of us struggle with finding the right words and using them in the most appropriate way to influence others, to share feelings and ideas. I train people to become better public speakers but I learned of a tragedy yesterday that got me thinking about how difficult it can be to speak at all under some circumstances and that sometimes words, for all their power, are inadequate.

When words don’t matter

A potential client mentioned that she was going to attend the funeral of a small child in Toronto and she didn’t know what to say to the parents. Of course, that got me thinking about when I’ve been in similar situations as well as the times in my life when I’ve faced major losses and what I needed from others. As I thought it through I realized that’s a time when words don’t really matter.

An unmovable force

I’m no expert in these areas and, fortunately, I’ve only had to deal with them a few times. But those experiences have taught me a great deal. And what I’ve learned is that those situations are so stark, so powerful, that nothing anyone can ever say will resolve them. The death of a loved one is an absolutely unmovable force that leaves us grasping to cope with its finality and our feelings of helplessness and isolation.

What grieving people need

And those feelings, I think, are our clue to providing comfort to people who have suffered a loss. As I thought about the feelings of those grieving parents I realized very clearly that the words we plan to say to them don’t matter. Just by being there with them, holding a hand, giving a hug tells that person more than anything we can say because what those grieving people need to know is that they are still part of our world, that they have people in their community who care about them and who share the pain of their loss.

A touch can say “I care”

We communicate in many ways and one of the strongest ways we communicate is through touch. If a picture is worth a thousand words, a touch is worth a thousand pictures. I think there is something primordial in us that needs the comfort of another human’s touch to get us through the darkest, most difficult times. There is something about a tender touch that can say, “I care . . . I share your feelings” And at times of loss the gentle touch of a hand or a comforting hug can provide support that can’t be measured.

More than anything you say

As a society, we’ve drifted away from a touching culture and, indeed, we have to be careful these days that our touches are not misunderstood. Common sense must rule. But the next time you have the opportunity to show your support of a friend or colleague who has endured a tragic loss, remember that just being there, listening and extending the hand of friendship will mean more than anything you may think you need to say.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to best develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today.  You’ll be glad you did!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area and across Ontario, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Oops! Wrong presentation style!

If you read this blog regularly, you know that I usually talk about presentation training, public speaking training and presentation style. Today I’m going to talk about presentation style, but not how it relates to presentation training. Interestingly though, the presentation style I’m talking about makes a very strong statement.

Outsourcing limits define themselves

Sometimes outsourcing makes sense and I don’t intend to get into a discussion of the morality of shipping jobs offshore. But sometimes the benefits can come back to bite us. Take, for example, the response my wife got when she sent the following query to Toronto’s Globe and Mail, which bills itself as Canada’s National Newspaper:

The Query

“Hi:  For the second time in the past month, I have been unable to locate a print article from your paper, online.  I was hoping to share the article with others….is there something I should know?  The article I’m currently referring to was in the Toronto section of the Saturday paper…a feature about the cafe Snakes & Lattes.”

The Response

Here’s the response she received:
“Thank you for your e-mail. For your reference not all articles that appeared on the print is available online.  Articles that does not appear online includes freelance writers and newswire service articles that we do not have an online license.
Sincerely,
Richard
Websupport@globeandmail.com
www.theglobeandmail.com”

The Conundrum

This is Canada’s National Newspaper, folks. This is one of the places we turn to as an authority on English language usage. It’s an image Toronto’s Globe and Mail has carefully nurtured for generations and it leaves the venerable institution looking rather tawdry that it cares so little about its readers’ responses, no matter how mundane they may be that they are schluffed off to someone whose language skills are basic at best – and apparently not checked by anyone..

There needs to be a bond

A newspaper – particularly a highly respected newspaper – is an institution and it has a certain responsibility to its readers, just as a public speaker has a responsibility to his or her audience, to make and maintain a personal connection. There needs to be a bond that can’t be outsourced to third world suppliers for the sake of squeezing an extra penny of profit for shareholders – if that bond is to be maintained.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Presentation training elected Toronto’s mayor

Toronto’s new mayor obviously did some presentation training with a public speaking trainer and paid close attention to at least one of the skills he learned.

Focus, focus, focus

One of the first lessons a presentation trainer would have taught Rob Ford, Toronto’s new mayor would have been focus. There are thousands of issues in a city the size of Toronto and one of Ford’s biggest presentation training tasks would have been to select those key messages that would resonate best with Toronto voters.

One message takes the prize

Ford knew what the Toronto electorate wanted and he promised to deliver on their wants. He promised to cut the waste at Toronto City Hall and reduce expenses across the board without reducing services. Because he was long on promises and short on specifics, he was criticized by most of Toronto’s political pundits. But Ford stuck to the mantra he and his public speaking trainer focused on. Whoever worked with him understood that, even if it’s heavily criticized, a single message repeated again and again is more powerful than a number of messages or a change in direction.

His focus was obvious and intentional

On election night, Toronto political pundits said his focus on a single message was a strong factor in his decisive victory. In his victory speech, Ford himself said “We were focused. They could not get us off our message.” Ford must now shift his focus to reaching out to those he will need to help him begin to deliver on his promises. If his commitment is strong enough, if he can win the allies and follow up words with actions, he may again surprise his critics and deliver much of what he promised. That will require an incredible amount of focus, hard work and probably more than a little good luck. For Rob Ford, the hard part has just begun.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Maintain control and attention

I watched a speaker use a very interesting public speaking technique today to maintain control of her audience. She was speaking about web development and there was someone in the audience who was also a web developer who knew as much as she did and maybe more.

A very simple technique

There were a number of questions during her presentation, as training people about web development can be complex. From time to time the expert in the audience would add his comment to her answers or would answer the question himself. He was trying to add value but his action drew focus and attention away from the primary public speaker. And to her credit the speaker held control of the room using a very, very simple technique.

She rephrased his words

She simply waited for the other expert to finish his explanation of the point and then she rephrased it in her own words. Now the interesting thing that happens here is that the audience member provided the information but in the audience’s mind, the final answer came from the presenter, not the person who provided the original information.

Own the room

I’ve always maintained that a speaker must ‘own the room’ both for her own sake and the audience’s. After all, the audience came to hear information from the person who is speaking, not from the audience members. That doesn’t mean I discourage speakers from allowing audience members to make comments. In fact I support that a hundred percent, because an interactive audience is a more attentive audience.

You are the expert

When you have a situation where someone is providing information during your presentation, training yourself to re-phrase his or her comments will help you keep control of your audience.  The audience will then associate that information with you because you were the last person they heard it from.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

This could have been avoided. . .

My heart goes out to Chris Neary. He’s the guy who got busted for carrying 15 kilos of marijuana, in a pack sack, across the border from Canada to the United States.

He was a business man

He wasn’t a smuggler. He was a small business man but his business wasn’t doing well. He became isolated from his friends and associates and, in his own words he was desperate, isolated and totally uniformed about what he was getting himself into. He said he didn’t ask anyone’s opinion about the wisdom of what he was doing. He just did it. Here’s a quote: “I felt it was up to me to turn things around and I tried to do everything myself. My ego took me to the top of the mountain literally.”

A lesson for all of us

Now, Chris has a lesson for all of us who are in business for ourselves. He fell into the classic small business trap of ‘I have to do it myself’ and this can lead to colossal failure and incredibly bad decisions. I know. I’ve made a few of them myself, and no, I never smuggled marijuana but I’ve done some awfully silly things in my small business that a colleague could have advised me against.

I’ve written about this

I’m just embarking on a small business alliance with another person who also provides communications services.  We don’t compete directly, although I suppose we could.  But it makes a lot more sense to support each other with business alliances.

We’re coaching each other

Here’s what we’re doing. We’re developing strategic plans for each of our businesses and we’re coaching each other to ensure that we follow our individual plans.  And when that gets rolling smoothly, we’re going to analyze how our individual pursuits can benefit both parties.

We both have challenges

She has different strengths than I have. I have different strengths than she has.  And of course, we both have our challenges.  Having done it on my own for many years, I welcome this affiliation.  Even though I’ve developed strategic partnerships in the past that fizzled and died, I really think this one is going to work.  I know from experience how difficult it can be to find the right person to work with you but when you can finally put it together the synergy is well worth the effort.

Develop strategic arrangements

If you’re a small business person who’s trying to do it all themselves, I urge you – stop doing this.  I can’t stress strongly enough the importance of aligning yourself with other people who can balance your challenges and who can benefit from your strengths. And you don’t have to limit yourself to one strategic partnership.  You can develop strategic arrangements with a wide group of people who have similar value.  If you find people you can align yourself with, who can help you to move forward while you help them to move forward, you’ll both benefit immeasurably.
What kind of strategic arrangements do you have in place?  How’s it working for you?  Tell us all about it.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

About that small type. . .

I hate tiny type.  I’m talking about those little six point faces that you see in peoples’ blogs all the time.

It’s hard to read

Now, I know they want to fit as much information as they can into a single computer screen, but there are issues around that. When you have small type it’s hard for some people to read it, particularly if you set that tiny type all the way across the screen.  By the time your reader gets to the right hand side of the screen it’s hard for them to pick up on the left hand side to read the next line.

I know . . .

As a guy who’s had cataracts and now has bionic lenses, I know that of which I speak.  Before my cataracts were removed and my natural lenses were replaced with acrylic reading small type was a frustrating, irritating experience.  And it probably caused me to miss a lot of valuable information, simply because I didn’t have the patience to stick with it.  It’s hard to appreciate what it’s like to have reduced vision until you’ve been there.

What I use

Personally, I use 12 point bold for my headings and 10 point for my body copy. Or, if you’re using the WordPress version that I use, it’s Arial – Normal –Larger.  I find that’s not overly large and it’s small enough that it’s flexible and fits well on the page. I’m able to work with it easily and although my entries may be a little bit longer than other bloggers’, I want to be able to reach those people who have issues with reading small type.

Lime green, anyone?

The other issue I encounter from time to time is colour.  I picked up a newsletter from a friend recently and he had a link on there that was set in tiny type, in lime green. Now, lime green against a white computer screen is very difficult to read. Try it; you’ll see what I mean.

Gain more readers

I would suggest that, for body copy, use such colours as dark blue, dark green, brown, black. They all work very, very well. If you want to emphasize something, or if you want to have sub-heads, you may want to set them in red or in a stong – but readable blue or green; something like that, but the body copy should be in dark colours. So please, think about this. Think about your reader. You’re going to gain more readers, in my opinion, if you use type that’s just a little larger and if you keep the body copy dark.
What do you say?  Am I preaching to the converted?  How do you make your blog copy readable?

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Name tags: backwards presentation?

Ever notice how most conferences get their information presentation backwards when it comes to name tags?  My colleague Ross Mavis www.chocolate-wellness.ca and I had a chuckle about it when we both attended the MagNet magazine conference in Toronto this past week.

All conferences do it

Ross squinted to read my name, which was presented in about 14-point type half way down my name tag, while above it, in screaming 60-point type was “MagNet 2010”.  Now, let me be clear: I’m not picking on the conference organizers.  Those people worked their tails off to bring us a super conference and they succeeded.  The presentations and networking were terrific.  So my issue isn’t with MagNet; it’s with every conference I’ve ever attended.  They all present name tag information backwards.

I know where I am

Ross said it best “Why do they do that?” he asked as he bent over to get a better look. “They present the conference name in huge type at the top and your name in small type beneath it.  I already know where I am, so I don’t have to see the conference name. I need to see the name of the person I’m talking to.  Some day I’m going to write an article why name tags are designed that way.  And every conference does it the same way.”  He laughed and I told him that, with his permission, I’d like to blog about it and, because we both believe conference organizers need to be made aware of the error of their ways, he agreed.

Both parties feel awkward

So, here’s the issue, all you conference organizers:  We attend your conferences mostly to meet people.  Yes, the presentations are informative and they provide value, but not as much value as the contacts we make in the halls, at receptions and other events.  The more smoothly we can connect with each other the better. And, let’s be honest, both parties feel a little awkward when they have to crane their necks down to read each other’s names.  And it’s particularly awkward for guys like me, who may have to don reading glasses to read the small type.

There’s another issue . . .

There’s another issue here and – how can I put this tastefully? – when I have trouble reading a name I may have to stare for a few seconds.  And, because of where name tags tend to hang, when I’m first meeting a woman I have to wonder if she’s becoming suspicious about what I’m actually looking at.

This is a quick fix

So, that’s the problem. Now, here’s the solution: simply switch the type sizes and positions.  Present our names, particularly our first names, in huge type at the top of the name tag and put the conference name discreetly across the bottom.  As Ross so eloquently pointed out, we don’t need to be reminded where we are.  We already know that.  But we need to be able to see who we’re talking to at a glance.  Help us out here, folks.  This is an easy fix.
What do you think?  Do you think conference name tags present information backwards?  Let’s hear from you.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Addicted to e-mail?

I’m addicted to my e-mail box.  It’s all I can do to stop myself from calling up Outlook first thing every morning – and every time I come back to the computer through the day.  It’s distracting, it’s frustrating and it’s totally unnecessary.

I have a life

I can’t begin to imagine what it’s like for people who walk around all day attached to a Blackberry.  And that’s a big part of the reason I’ve refused to buy one.  Sure, I have a professional practice.  But I also have a life.  And my life comes first.  My practice comes second and I like it that way.

So many distractions

Besides, I’m not sure that staring into a Blackberry or obsessively checking e-mail is productive in the long run.  I’ve always admired people who have the discipline to be truly strategic.  It’s easy to be a strategic thinker; it’s quite another to put that thinking into practice in your everyday activities.  Because there are so many distractions, like Blackberries and e-mail boxes – not to mention that paradigm of attention deficit:: the internet.

It’s difficult

Discipline is difficult in the age of the internet.  We just have too many things we can do while staring at an LCD screen and it’s much too easy to ignore simple, rewarding things that are happening all around us in the real world.  There’s a time for focused work and a time for spontaneous play and, unfortunately, our computers, Blackberries and other technical toys allow us to do both and to neglect other things.  I know; I’ve been there.  And unfortunately, if I don’t discipline myself, I can return there all too often.  Just ask my wife.

Keep the beast at bay

Here are a few of the things I try to do to keep the online beast at bay and to lead a more or less productive, fruitful life:

  •     I put family first.  Obviously, there are times when I have to go to meetings or do desk work during what would normally be family time but, as much as I can, I try to make myself available to family, including looking after those little chores that mean so much to my wife.
  •    I’ve disconnected automatic e-mail delivery in my Outlook.  I look at my e-mails when I want to, not when the computer  beckons me with a tempting “ping”
  •     I try to download my e-mails no more than three or four times a day, unless I’m expecting something urgent
  •     I try to create a working plan for each week and a detailed plan for each day, prepared the day or evening before
  •     I keep a paper-based Priority List and a separate paper-based To Do list; I give priority to the priorities and fit the to-do’s in between them
  •     I try to prevent my largest priorities from consuming me by breaking them down and moving each one forward a little bit each day
  •     I avoid visiting interesting-sounding websites as soon as I hear about them.  Instead, I add them to a list, then pick an hour or two when I’m between priorities to visit several at the same sitting

I try . . .

Like everyone else, I like to think I’m pretty organized but it’s an ongoing process and yes, I slip up and sin as much as anyone and probably a lot more than some people.   You’ll notice the word “try” appears regularly in the list above and I do “try”.  But I accept that I’m not always successful.  I’m always looking for ways to improve my efficiency and reduce my distractions.  If you have any devices to share with me, I’d love to hear about them.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Toyota’s making it right . . . finally

Have you seen the new “Making it right” commercial Toyota’s running?  The one where they capitalize on nostalgia and Toyota’s good name to try to woo customers back to the showrooms?  The strategy is good for the situation Toyota finds itself in but I shake my head that they have to run them at all.  It’s another great example of how one of the strongest brands in the world can flush itself down the toilet, lose millions of customers, tens of millions of dollars in sales, then spend millions more trying to paddle their way out of a mess they didn’t have to get into in the first place.

Put customers first

All they had to do was put their customers first, as they’ve done for more than 30 years and continue to build cars that were beyond reproach.  But instead they took the short view and ended up paying and paying and paying in the long run.  It will be years before Toyota’s brand fully recovers – if ever.

Do the right thing

It’s simple: do the right thing.  Solve manageable problems while they’re still manageable.  Admit, apologize, take whatever beating you have coming to you and make a big deal of what you’re doing to fix it.  But do it before the media and government commissions pounding your brand on a daily basis and your formerly loyal customers are screaming for your head.

Take action immediately

There must be something I’m missing here because I don’t see that this is so difficult.  In fact it’s simple logic: look after your customers.  Take action and resolve the issue immediately.  The obvious answer is that someone didn’t want to admit that this happened on his or her watch and that Toyota is big enough and fat enough that this someone thought that he or she could get away with it.

Make it right

It looks to me like some corporate heads should be rolling if they’re not rolling already.  Akio Toyoda, the company’s president, says he takes “personal responsibility” for the company’s problems.  So is he going to do the honourable thing and resign?  Well, no.  Instead he’s going to lead a campaign to “Make it right!”.  That’s very noble but let’s face it, if he’d provided the leadership to make it right in the first place he wouldn’t be in this mess.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Great Olympics, John but the speech needed work

Like most Canadians, I watched the closing ceremonies for the Vancouver Olympics last night.  I think the Vancouver Organizing Committee did an awesome job.  And that’s why I was so disappointed by  John Furlong’s closing speech.  Not the speech itself, which was brilliantly written, but by his delivery.
First, he started off in some of the worst French I’ve heard in my life.  Truly awful and, in my opinion, a little demeaning, both to French Canada and to French people around the world.  And, unfortunately, his English delivery wasn’t much better.

He read the text

He read virtually the entire prepared text, word for word.  And he did it in a flat uninspired manner that left what could have been inspiring text lifeless and dull.  His writer had prepared some powerful phrases that called for a rousing delivery, followed by  pauses to let the audience share in the moment.  Instead, he read one sentence after another, pausing only when the audience broke into spontaneous applause at the mention of specific events.

A back story

There has to be a back story behind this delivery because a speech as high profile as that one for an event as important as the Olympics has to have the budget for some coaching.  My suspicion is that either Furlong refused or resisted coaching.  And he may have had his reasons.  Or perhaps he’s one of those rare individuals who simply cannot – or does not – see the value in putting power in their words.

I congratulate the committee

Whatever the reasons, I was disappointed for everyone, including him, that his closing presentation did not live up to all that he had accomplished in leading the preparations for what was truly an exhilarating event.  I’m prepared to give him the benefit of the doubt because he did so much for so many people all over the world.  I congratulate him and the entire organizing committee and I sincerely hope the next time he’s invited to speak at a high profile event that he’ll make the most of some presentation training.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.