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Positive affirmations help public speaking

I was doing some work with a client recently and recommended the use of positive affirmations to build public speaking self-confidence.  The client had never heard of positive affirmations so I did a little digging on the internet and have found a site that explains them quite well: http://www.successconsciousness.com/index_00000a.htm.  I don’t agree with everything on the site but it does provide a very simple, succinct definition of what positive affirmations are and how to use them.

 

You don’t have to buy anything

There is a plethora of sites on positive affirmations but, like most websites, they are aimed at trying to sell you something. You don’t have to buy anything to use positive affirmations effectively. You simply need to think positively, be realistic and be disciplined enough to repeat your affirmations often.

 

They nurture positive thought loops

Positive affirmations are valuable because most people have a head full of negative self-thoughts that were placed there by others, either intentionally or inadvertently. People say hurtful, diminishing things and, too often, we absorb them indiscriminately . . . and the negative thought loops begin. Positive affirmations do the exact opposite. They nurture positive thought loops that are based on the very real positive traits we embody. Those thought loops remind us of who we really are on an ongoing basis and, with repetition, they replace negative thoughts that limit us and make us vulnerable.

 

We’ve been taught to be humble

One of the hardest parts of starting to use positive affirmations is overcoming the uncomfortable feeling that we’re inflating our egos or spawning arrogance. That’s because we’ve been taught to be humble, to “stay in your place”, to listen and obey. Those admonitions are valuable for small – and not so small – children who need mature guidance. But in the adult world there are ongoing challenges that require judgement, courage and confidence, all of which require us to believe in ourselves. And that’s pretty difficult to do if you’re repeating negative statements to yourself all day, every day. The exact opposite is true if you’re repeating true, positive statements.

 

They really work

Obviously, your affirmations have to be real. Otherwise you’re deluding yourself. But the problem is that most people have covered their positive traits with so many negative thoughts that they can’t even find their positivity anymore. Positive affirmations can change that. And yes, they really work. You’ll need to be honest, disciplined and give the process a little time to do its work and it will deliver.

 

Concentrate on what you have

As I mentioned, I have some issues with the article I’m providing, even though it provides a very adequate definition of positive affirmations. Most of my issues are embodied in the list of affirmations provided. It almost reads like a wish list of what the speaker wants but does not currently have. I prefer to concentrate on what you currently have but do not believe strongly enough.

 

It helps your self-image

For example: I am strong. I am a good mother/father. I am a good husband/wife. I am intelligent. I am a hard worker. I am a leader. I am compassionate. I can forgive. I am attractive (I didn’t say you were Brad Pitt or Angelina Jolie – just “attractive J”. Believe me, it helps your self-image when you recognize and acknowledge that).

 

Smile at yourself

Feel free to use any of the positive affirmations I’ve suggested to get you started. But start. The sooner, the better. It’s a good idea, if it works into your daily routine, to stand in front of a mirror to recite your affirmations. You don’t have to say them out loud; you can just think them to yourself if privacy is an issue. And when you’re doing it, smile at yourself and remind yourself that you like what you see. I suggest you start with about five and add to them on an ongoing basis. It’s also a good idea to write them down and refer to them from time to time.

 

Enjoy!

Perhaps the most important thing is to enjoy them. We tend to avoid things we find unpleasant. Positive affirmations should be a joy, not a chore.

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Thomas Moss is a career communications professional with more than 30 years experience in public speaking training, public relations, sales and journalism. When you’re ready to deal with your fear of public speaking by training with a professional who gets results, call 416-762-8488 in the Greater Toronto Area or 905-655-0119 in Durham Region, or click on this text to reach me by e-mail.

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Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Public Speaking vs. Insensitivity

My public speaking and presentation training practice deals a lot with the fallout from insensitive people. And that’s because we often define ourselves based on the comments of insensitive people.

We all have them

We all have insensitive people in our lives, and they’re insidious. They dig into insecurities to give them life. And those insecurities can haunt us long after the insensitive person has moved on, and if you think that doesn’t affect our public speaking and presentation abilities, guess again.

It’s insecurity

So, why are some people so insensitive to other people’s feelings? I don’t have a definitive answer to that one, but in my experience it’s usually based on insecurity and the need to overcompensate for feelings of inadequacy. And when we call the offenders on their abuse the fallout can permanently damage important relationships. So we hold back, because many of these people are central to our sense of clan and community.

I see the damage

I see the damage insensitive people wreak in my public speaking and presentation training practice. I see it in the person who is bursting with passion and terrified to stand up to tell the world about it. I see it in highly capable people who have been told in innumerable ways that they are inadequate. I see it in the stress of people so deeply imbued with criticism and bullying that they are too paralyzed to even try to communicate, influence others and improve their world.

I do something about it

I try to do something about it. I encourage people to put their oppressors – and the insecurities they engender – in their proper place. I encourage them to act and think positively, regardless of what they hear, to build invisible fences between themselves and their antagonists.

It’s difficult

I’ve been bullied. I’ve been emotionally blackmailed. I continue to experience it from time to time. It’s difficult to deal with for any of us because, on many levels, we feel helpless. We’re damned if we engage our antagonists and damned if we don’t.

What to do

So here’s what I suggest we do: Instead of creating a scene, consider the source. What qualifies these people to make their comments? In my experience, the answer is “nothing at all”. So if they’re unqualified to comment, why give them credence?

Dump the garbage

The next thing to do is dump the garbage. As soon as we have the opportunity, we need to dump that crap and get on with the positive elements in our lives. And we can do that by talking to someone who understands. We can write about it, we can exercise, do yoga, meditate, play an instrument –anything that helps to cleanse our souls.

 

Avoid them

My favourite strategy is simply to avoid dealing with negative people as much as possible. It’s a big world and there are countless creative, exciting, positive people out there. So why would I want to hang out with frightened, angry individuals whose negative view of the world reduces them and everyone around them? I simply don’t do it if I can avoid it.

 

We’re terrified to speak

So what does all of this have to do with public speaking? Everything. Many of us are so accustomed to being criticized and bullied that we’re terrified to speak up. And in most cases, those perceptions have been visited upon us by others, most of whom had no idea what they were inflicting upon us.

 

You’re not what other people say

So here’s my message to you: You’re not what other people say you are. You’re a combination of what you believe you are and what you do for others. How does that relate to public speaking? Here’s how: the person who has the passion, drive and confidence to deliver something of value possesses the power to change their world for the better.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

How to talk to a dying friend

This post is dedicated to my dear friend David, who passed away in Toronto on June 3, 2012

All the public speaking training and presentation training in the world does not prepare you for talking to a dying friend; at times like that you just have to find what you hope is going to work and use it.

I did my best

We got the call about 5pm on Sunday, June 3. David, my sister-in-law’s life partner, who had been unconscious for more than a week, was about to be taken off life support. An hour later I entered his room at the Toronto General Hospital to support her but I ended up doing my best to support both of them during a very difficult time.

That voice . . .

David had always been a slight man but the voice that had come out of that 135-pound frame had commanded attention. He’d had the voice I’d always wanted and the kind of projection that I encourage my public speaking workshop participants to develop. He’d have been a natural for radio but, interestingly, although his first job was with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, he never appeared on air, preferring the sales area, and he continued to work in sales with many companies throughout his 50-year career.

Silent

It was strange to see him lying there, connected to machines and silent. Because David was never silent. He l-o-o-o-ved (that’s the way he liked to pronounce it) to boom that voice at whomever was present and regale them with stories about the years he spent in New York, about his family members’ achievements and, of course, about his beloved Toronto Blue Jays.

Something he never said

But there was something he never told those people. No one knew that David had overcome a very serious stammer by using a very simple technique that works magic. He had discovered that if he paused before he spoke he could control his stammer.

No one heard

It was the very same technique that I teach in my public speaking training sessions to help speakers recover when they stumble during a presentation. He had perfected this technique to a point where no one heard the pauses and, during the rare occasions when the stammer slipped in, he was able to recover within a second or two.

Now he was silent

But now he was silent, a tube pushing air into his lungs, monitors graphing his bodily functions. We agreed that it was not a situation David would want to be in for long and so, after agonizing, my sister-in-law permitted his caregivers to turn the machines off and let nature take its course.

“Just keep talking”

His nurse came in and out a few times as she disconnected the machines that had been keeping him alive for more than a week. On one of those trips she smiled and said, “Just keep talking to him. He can hear you.” We looked at each other and my sister-in-law told him that the Blue Jays had won their most recent game, then turned to me and said, “I don’t know what to say . . .”

What should we say?

I knew how she felt. What should we say? I took his hand and thought about what would give him comfort in the final moments of his life and started. I don’t remember my exact words, but I do know that I told him how proud I was to have had him for a brother-in-law. I thanked him for taking such good care of my wife’s sister for the past 25 years. I said I knew his biggest concern would be for her and that he could rest easy because my wife and I would look after her for him. I reminded him that he had brought a great deal of comfort to others during their difficult times and now he could just relax and rest easy during his.

An audience of one

It was hard to know exactly when to stop talking, but I continued for as long as I thought he could hear me, at one point even saying that I would “try” to sit through a Blue Jays game for him (he knew I didn’t care much for baseball). In short, I tried to do what any speaker should do for any audience. I simply tried to think of what was most important to him and express it in a way that would comfort him. Comfort was the value I needed to provide to this audience of one.

A difficult subject

Death is a difficult subject for most of us, although it gets a little easier as we age and its inevitability becomes more obvious. I’ve talked before on this blog about talking to bereaved family and friends and now I’ve discovered, through personal experience, how to talk to loved ones who are in their final stages of life.

Farewell, my friend

I wish David well on his journey and I sincerely hope that the words and thoughts I shared with him gave him some comfort in his final moments.

Difficult public speaking task successful

Hats off to the Duchess of Cambridge. She took on a difficult public speaking task recently and came through with shining colours.

She was a little nervous

“Kate”, as she’s known to most of us, delivered her first official speech at the East Anglian Children’s Hospice this week and, like most new speakers, she was a little nervous. Like most speakers, she struggled at the beginning, even though she undoubtedly worked with highly skilled presentation trainers and public speaking coaches. But she got through it fine and, overall, she did quite well.

She looked down at her notes

If I wanted to be hyper-critical, I could talk about how she looked down at her notes as much as she looked at her audience but for me, that was a small issue. She’s not accustomed to speaking in public. She is the future Queen of England and is therefore required to stick to her script to the letter and, as such, she knew that every word she spoke would be recorded, transmitted to millions of people, evaluated, assessed and criticized. Not your run-of-the-mill after-dinner address, even if she did have presentation training from top public speaking trainers.

A formidable group

She had plenty at stake and she knew it. Given that kind of pressure she did quite well, particularly given of the nature of the group she was speaking to. She was facing child residents of a hospice and their parents, knowing that those children would never mature, that those parents faced a future without their child; that this “precious time” as Kate referred to it, was short. What a formidable group to address as her first audience.

She stayed focused

Kate was very controlled. Partly because it’s her job to appear steadfast and strong. But I’ll bet that there was more than royal protocol running through her head as she prepared for and finally faced that audience. It’s an open secret that she and William hope to have their own child in the near future but, regardless of what private thoughts may have been on her mind, she stayed focused on the need to keep the audience’s attention on her royal visit rather than her unseen royal emotions.

She didn’t flinch

She could have so easily drifted into maudlin sentimentality or revealed her emotions, but she didn’t. It’s not easy for a woman who obviously loves kids to speak to terminally ill children and their parents as though they are any other group of parents and children. But she did it. Yes, she looked a little uncomfortable but she didn’t flinch.

Focus on her audience

Of course Kate has had plenty of public speaking training and we can expect that her presentation was heavily rehearsed. And I suspect that her presentation trainer helped her to contain her emotions. Her presentation trainer probably told her to focus on her audience, not on herself; and that what they felt would be more important than how she felt as she spoke.

Emotions can be difficult

We all have a duty to our audiences. After all, they are – or should be – the reason we’re up there in the first place. Emotions can be difficult to control. But sometimes they have to be squarely placed in the back seat while we navigate through what our audience needs to hear.

Stay focused

While it’s important in most instances to let our passion speak for us, as speakers, we have to recognize when it’s more important to stay focused on the message and to stick to it, regardless of how it makes us feel. You can see how Kate handled her challenge here.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Protect your public speaking voice

I recently had a client who was training to deliver presentations to a number of divisions across Toronto and the GTA over a period of several days. The steady grind was taking a toll on his vocal chords and he asked what he could do to lubricate them.

Lots of dry throat remedies

Lubricating vocal chords just doesn’t come up very often very often in public speaking training, so of course, I did what everybody does these days: I Googled it. As always, there were lots of different opinions, and dry throat remedies, including a few that surprised me. And of course we have to take just about anything we read on the internet with a grain of salt until we’ve tried it ourselves or checked it out with someone we trust.

An interesting gargle

Speaking of salt, Dr. Van Lawrence, laryngologist for the Houston Grand Opera recommended the following gargle recipe: 1/2 tsp. of salt, 1/2 tsp. of baking soda, 1/2 tsp. of clear corn syrup, and 6 oz. of warmed, distilled water. He suggested that you gargle silently for two minutes, that you avoid rinsing and repeat this gargle as often as you need to. He also recommended drinking two quarts of water each day.

Saliva stimulators

But blues singer Isabella Snow has her own dry throat remedies. She says that water is only effective for a moment or two after drinking it, that nothing lubricates a throat better than saliva and nothing stimulates saliva production better than a sip of pineapple juice. If that’s not readily available, a bit of strawberry juice wins second prize, followed by honey and olives. The worst things you can drink, she says, are water, tea and beer. I’d add coffee to that list as well. You can learn more – and hear some of her blues styling here. If you listen to the clip at that link you’ll understand why she should know a thing or two about voice lubrication.

Last resort: water

In spite of what Snow says about water, if it’s the only lubricant you can easily turn to, I’d use it. I tried her pineapple juice alternative last week and it worked for me. But I don’t always have access to pineapple juice so my second choice would be water, consumed in small sips – just enough to lubricate my larynx, but not enough to bring on the need for a bio break in the middle of my presentation.

Probably the best approach is to experiment a bit to see what works best for you. You can buy expensive voice lubricants but if something as simple and inexpensive as pineapple juice, strawberry juice, baking soda and salt will work just as well or better, why not give them a try?

Vocal chords are delicate

One last suggestion: give your voice and your body plenty of rest. Remember that the vocal chords are just a set of muscles. But because they’re very delicate, they need proper care. And like any muscles, they can become strained. So if you’re doing your presentations over long distances that require traveling in dry atmospheres such as a commercial jet or train coach, be sure to keep your throat moist.

None for the road

Avoid excessive alcohol or coffee consumption and social situations like loud night clubs or sporting events where you may be tempted to strain your voice. And make sure you get plenty of rest. Rested vocal chords will perform better and longer than strained ones. And you’ll present your material with greater enthusiasm overall.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Presentation training vs. speech writing

I enjoy speech writing. It’s a little different from my public speaking and presentation training work but it uses a lot of the same principles. The difference is that I have to visualize my client doing the presentation or speech as I’m writing it. And for that, there’s nothing as valuable as good old face-face contact. My PWAC (Professional Writers Association of Canada) colleague Bonnie Zink recently posted a link about the process and she agreed to have me post her comments here as a guest blog:

No substitute for face-to-face

I’ve been writing speeches for many years. I have learned through experience that there is no substitute for a face-to-face (F2F) (or phone call) meeting with the client before one word is written or edited. I find out several things during the meeting that I don’t feel would be as easily captured via email.

Capture their personality

First, a F2F meeting allows me to get to know the presenter. I’ve found that writing speeches is an exercise in living in someone else’s head. I need to know their speech patterns. I need to know their mannerisms. I need to know how fast or slow they speak (helps with gauging word count later on). I need to know if they are naturally witty. This helps me capture their personality on paper through the words I choose to write on their behalf.

The presenter’s point of view

Second, the F2F allows me the time to get to know the material from the presenter’s point of view. We discuss key topics. We discuss time allowed for delivery. I find out what their favourite quotes are. We discuss the presenter’s favourite anecdotes that may be helpful in showing the audience the concepts we are writing about. I find out who the audience is. I find out many more valuable tid bits that are priceless when it comes to writing (or editing) the speech.

The details

Finally, a F2F allows the presenter and I to get to know, and agree upon, the details of the project. We discuss deadlines, language, rates, as well as research and writing time estimates.

No substitute

I believe that there really isn’t a substitute for the F2F meeting. Email is great during the work, but an initial hour or two of face time is priceless. I find out more in that hour spent with the client than I can via the phone or emails.

Well said, Bonnie

As I read what Bonnie had written I found myself nodding in agreement. The only thing I would add is that it’s a lot of fun to, as she puts it, “live inside someone else’s head”. I’m glad to hear that other writers enjoy the process as much as I do. For me, speech writing is right up there with presentation training and public speaking training.

If you’d like to connect with Bonnie, here’s how to reach her:

Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/BonnieZink
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/BZWriter
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/bonniezink
GooglePlus: http://gplus.to/BonnieZink

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Does that make sense?

As a public speaking coach, I was intrigued by a discussion on the Harvard Business Review Blog about whether a speaker should use the phrase “Does that makes sense?” while doing a presentation or training session.

Are you serious?

My first response was, “Are you serious? Do you really think this is an issue?” But apparently some people – particularly people who need something to write about – think it is. Well, it’s not an issue for me; it’s just a fact of life.

It’s my duty

In addition to my one-on-one presentation coaching sessions I facilitate a lot of corporate workshops and public workshops, where I’m presenting concepts that are very familiar to me which may be brand new to the people I’m speaking to. It’s my duty – and it’s the duty of every facilitator – to check in with the audience from time to time. If you don’t, you can’t be sure you’ve really communicated.

Communication is slippery

One thing I’ve learned from hard experience as a writer and speaker is that communication is a slippery thing. I don’t think you really appreciate how slippery it is until you’re writing material that’s published to tens of thousands of people or when you’re publishing to a small but very critical audience. It’s amazing what people can read into what you’ve said, how they can misinterpret, misunderstand and generally just not “get” what you’re trying to convey. And often it’s nobody’s fault; it’s just the fragility of the communications process.

I always check in

I always check in with my audience to make sure I’ve said what I think I’ve said. And I look for nods. If I don’t see them I follow up with something like, “Hmmm . . . I’m not seeing any recognition out there . . . Have I communicated?. . . Is this clear for everyone before I move on?” That usually brings a few nods even from a reluctant audience and I’m able to move forward.

I ask

I only speak in public for one reason: to provide value. And I don’t know if I’ve provided value if people don’t tell me. And most times – at least during a presentation or training – they don’t tell me unless I ask. So I ask. And I get responses.

It’s crucial

If you’re doing presentations or training, I suggest you check in with your audience from time to time. I’ll admit that when you’re doing a formal speech it’s less necessary but in my opinion it’s absolutely crucial in the training process.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Politicians provide public speaking training

I love listening to politicians, particularly because their actions often provide valuable public speaking training lessons.

Hudak made himself a target

Training, specifically Canadian training for recent immigrants, has become a hot issue in the current Ontario election. A couple of days ago I heard Ontario Conservative leader Tim Hudak tear into a plan floated by the Liberals to provide a $10,000 incentive to any company that hired new immigrants to allow them to get some Canadian training. Hudak sounded a bit like a junkyard dog and, with just a little froth around the corners of his mouth, he tore into the plan with venom saying his government would provide jobs for Canadians, not “foreign workers”. And with that one little phrase Hudak made himself a public speaking target that Liberal leader, Dalton McGuinty lost no time in attacking.

“The Tea Party element”

With the smoothness that comes from years and years as a ruling party leader, McGuinty pointed out that “in my Ontario there is no ‘them and us’, there is only ‘us’”. He went on to contrast his party with the Conservatives by referring to some of Hudak’s supporters as “the Tea Party element”. What a beautiful comeback! Whoever wrote those words for McGuinty deserves a raise.

Know your audience

It’s all delightful theatre but what are the lessons here? I think the first one is, know your audience; know what your audience needs and wants to hear. Hudak may have been appeasing some of the elements in his constituency with his reference to “foreign workers” but in this case I think McGuinty was more in tune with the broader electorate.

Choose your words

The second lesson is: choose your words carefully. Labeling new immigrants as “foreign workers” is dangerous territory and potentially inflammatory to Ontario’s millions of immigrant voters. Hudak virtually handed McGuinty the high ground and McGuinty was more than happy to occupy it.

Present your facts well

The third lesson is to know your facts and present them well. Based on his comments, it sounds as though Hudak grabbed the basic information and just came out swinging whereas McGuinty gave a considered, measured controlled response. If Hudak had analayzed Mcguinty’s policy more thoroughly and offered a better alternative he would have come off sounding much more attractive to the majority of voters.

Prepare your messages

And that brings me to the final message: know what messages your words and actions should deliver and prepare them well. One of McGuinty’s key messages in this election is the need for stable, experienced leadership and Hudak gave him the opportunity to deliver that message once again. Unfortunately for Hudak, he left the impression that he’s an angry reactionary, not a steady hand. As public speakers, we must always remember that it’s the unspoken messages that can be most lasting and powerful of all.

Win with honey

To be fair, a little later the same day, Hudak came off as cool,and relaxed and well informed. He needs to cultivate that persona more and the hot headed critic less. That old adage about winning more flies with honey than with vinegar still applies.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.