Presentation notes? Absolutely!

I’ll be doing a presentation in Richmond Hill next week and, as usual, I’ll have my trusty notes with me. I wouldn’t think of doing a presentation without notes. It would be like taking a trip to an unfamiliar destination without a map. And that’s because every presentation I do is slightly different.

Why use them?

So if every presentation is different, why do I need notes? Well, that’s because I like to take little side trips here and there. And when I’m finished those side trips I like to come back to where I left the main topic. My presentation notes are a little different from a map. They’re more like a compass that brings me back when I want them to. I use them, but only to remind me where I am and where I want to go next.

It depends

Most public speakers feel that doing a presentation without notes is more polished, and on at least one level I suppose it is. But does that mean that working with presentation notes is somehow amateurish? I don’t think so. It depends on several things. It depends on the audience. It depends on the style of the address. And I think what it depends on most is how you use those notes.

What comes next?

No one wants to hear a speech that’s read word-for-word. But no one wants to watch a polished presenter squirm because he or she just had a momentary memory lapse, can’t remember what’s supposed to come next and doesn’t know where to go to find out. While I’ve seen lots of speakers who can apparently do a 45-minute talk without presentation notes, I’ve seen a lot more who know how to cleverly hide them. It’s very rare speaker who works without a net of some kind.

Essential information

It’s not a matter of whether you have presentation notes or don’t have them. It’s entirely about how you use them. Like I said, my presentation notes are like a compass for me and, like a compass, they provide essential, but minimal information. They consist of sub-headings with bullet points under each one. With a quick glance at my presentation notes I know exactly what I want to talk about for the next few minutes and if someone asks a question or makes a comment while I’m delivering the next section I always know exactly what point I want to come back to. My notes keep me on track and the presentation on time because I note where I should be time-wise  beside each sub-head. So if I need to jump ahead at some point I can do so smoothly.

I’m there to inform

My notes are precious to me because they ensure that my audience is going to receive every piece of information I want them to have. I’m not there to impress; I’m there to inform. And if having a sheaf of papers in my hand or on a desk is distracting then I’m doing a lousy job of engaging and informing. Because if I’m truly engaging and informing, no one is even going to see those papers let alone be distracted by them. Instead, they’ll be listening to my words, considering them and deciding how and if they want to put them into practice.

Presentation notes add value

Solid presentation notes used effectively can add significantly to the value of your presentation. And as you’ve heard me say so many times before, the value you impart is all that really matters.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Oops! Wrong presentation style!

If you read this blog regularly, you know that I usually talk about presentation training, public speaking training and presentation style. Today I’m going to talk about presentation style, but not how it relates to presentation training. Interestingly though, the presentation style I’m talking about makes a very strong statement.

Outsourcing limits define themselves

Sometimes outsourcing makes sense and I don’t intend to get into a discussion of the morality of shipping jobs offshore. But sometimes the benefits can come back to bite us. Take, for example, the response my wife got when she sent the following query to Toronto’s Globe and Mail, which bills itself as Canada’s National Newspaper:

The Query

“Hi:  For the second time in the past month, I have been unable to locate a print article from your paper, online.  I was hoping to share the article with others….is there something I should know?  The article I’m currently referring to was in the Toronto section of the Saturday paper…a feature about the cafe Snakes & Lattes.”

The Response

Here’s the response she received:
“Thank you for your e-mail. For your reference not all articles that appeared on the print is available online.  Articles that does not appear online includes freelance writers and newswire service articles that we do not have an online license.
Sincerely,
Richard
Websupport@globeandmail.com
www.theglobeandmail.com”

The Conundrum

This is Canada’s National Newspaper, folks. This is one of the places we turn to as an authority on English language usage. It’s an image Toronto’s Globe and Mail has carefully nurtured for generations and it leaves the venerable institution looking rather tawdry that it cares so little about its readers’ responses, no matter how mundane they may be that they are schluffed off to someone whose language skills are basic at best – and apparently not checked by anyone..

There needs to be a bond

A newspaper – particularly a highly respected newspaper – is an institution and it has a certain responsibility to its readers, just as a public speaker has a responsibility to his or her audience, to make and maintain a personal connection. There needs to be a bond that can’t be outsourced to third world suppliers for the sake of squeezing an extra penny of profit for shareholders – if that bond is to be maintained.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Ignatieff’s presentation style is improving

While Canadian Opposition Leader Michael Ignatieff remains the butt of comedians’ jokes for his aristocratic bearing, I think he deserves marks for getting his presentation style together – finally.

He changed his presentation style

Ignatieff, whose intellect and association with academe has separated him from common Canadians, struggled through his first year as the Leader of the Opposition to make a connection with average Canadians. But his bus tour this past summer went a long way toward softening his image as a cold, aloof elitist who was just going through the motions of caring about average people. The tour was a carefully planned political strategy designed to connect the leader with the voters and it might have failed if Ignatieff himself hadn’t changed his presentation style.

He showed his personality

And what he did was very simple: he acted like himself instead of someone else’s vision of how he should look, talk and act. He ignored his advisors, let his hair down, took the tie off and talked to people as one concerned Canadian to another instead of a snob who was controlled by party mandarins in Toronto. And it worked like a charm. While his official approval rating with voters remained about the same, those who took the trouble to meet him in person were impressed with his presentation style and his personality. And those individuals were the people the Liberal Party were targeting with this tour. Because they could help lay the fabric for a future election campaign. And even those who could never support him in an election came away with a positive impression.

He showed his humanity

All of this came about because Ignatieff stopped using prepared texts for every statement he made and he let his own instinct override his advisors; he showed his humanity. And showing humanity virtually always makes a connection. Now, obviously if he were commenting on a crisis he’d be wise to stick to the script and, as anyone in public life knows, it would be necessary for him to be aware of what he was saying and how his words could be interpreted at all times. It’s a skilled politician who can show feelings while controlling the message, which is why so many of them hide behind prepared texts.

You can do what he did

You may not be running for office but, when it’s your turn to get up and speak, I suggest that you consider your presentation style. Personally, I like to work with point form notes and let my instinct decide how I should get them across. You may want to try that to see if your presentations feel more spontaneous for both you and your audience. You may just find that you make a much stronger connection.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Presentation training elected Toronto’s mayor

Toronto’s new mayor obviously did some presentation training with a public speaking trainer and paid close attention to at least one of the skills he learned.

Focus, focus, focus

One of the first lessons a presentation trainer would have taught Rob Ford, Toronto’s new mayor would have been focus. There are thousands of issues in a city the size of Toronto and one of Ford’s biggest presentation training tasks would have been to select those key messages that would resonate best with Toronto voters.

One message takes the prize

Ford knew what the Toronto electorate wanted and he promised to deliver on their wants. He promised to cut the waste at Toronto City Hall and reduce expenses across the board without reducing services. Because he was long on promises and short on specifics, he was criticized by most of Toronto’s political pundits. But Ford stuck to the mantra he and his public speaking trainer focused on. Whoever worked with him understood that, even if it’s heavily criticized, a single message repeated again and again is more powerful than a number of messages or a change in direction.

His focus was obvious and intentional

On election night, Toronto political pundits said his focus on a single message was a strong factor in his decisive victory. In his victory speech, Ford himself said “We were focused. They could not get us off our message.” Ford must now shift his focus to reaching out to those he will need to help him begin to deliver on his promises. If his commitment is strong enough, if he can win the allies and follow up words with actions, he may again surprise his critics and deliver much of what he promised. That will require an incredible amount of focus, hard work and probably more than a little good luck. For Rob Ford, the hard part has just begun.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Keeping cool under pressure

I see that Bill Clinton is doing a lot of campaigning for Barack Obama these days. That’s because Obama is having a tough time with the electorate. The star of the 2008 election campaign has lost his shine, pummeled by sagging polls, demonization by the Republican Party and rejection of his policies by the US electorate. But what’s interesting, from a communications perspective, is Obama’s outward appearance.

He keeps his cool

Where former president George Bush, tended to reveal his personal feelings in his face and his body language, all of Obama’s current unpopularity does not seem to faze him. He always appears cool, easy going, and uncaring. He has said he would rather be a one-term president who does the right things than compromise his principles for a second term. He appears, at least on the surface, to tread the high ground and be impervious to what’s happening around him.

Confidence is a winner

Obama is smart enough to know the importance of keeping his personal insecurities to himself. That unflappable exterior is as least as powerful as his oratorical skills. He knows how to use words and phrases that inspire people and express his sentiments. But he knows people will remember his image long after they’ve forgotten his words.

No need to tell all

Sometimes what you don’t say in a presentation can be as important as what you do say. Obama wouldn’t dream of telling you he was nervous, even if he was and yet the first words some public speakers say are ‘Oh I’m so nervous’. Admitting to your audience that you’re nervous undermines their confidence in you. But if you just relax, take a deep breath, focus on the value you’re providing, and move forward you’ll probably make a strong impression. That’s what Obama’s doing and that’s his lesson for us.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Making a promise adds power

A good way to get and keep your audience’s attention when you’re doing a public presentation is to make a promise. When you commit to what you’ll deliver at the beginning of your presentation you can grab attention right away. Your promise can sound something like this:  “Over the next hour or so, I’m going to share with you the four best ways to ____________”.

Create curiousity

Tell your listeners exactly what to expect. If you know your audience, aim your promises directly at what matters to them and use words and phrases that are meaningful to them, you’ll create curiosity and interest in your presentation. You’ll also enhance your credibility as an expert in your subject area.

Training yourself to use this approach

Training yourself to use this approach when you’re public speaking can help you to hold your audience. They’ll know what’s coming and be waiting for the information you’ve promised. One public speaker I know here in Toronto likes to use a slight variation on this technique. He likes to follow each promise with a question: “Would that have value for you?” In addition to being a public speaker he’s also a sales trainer and he uses each question as a trial closing. He’s testing the audience members to see if they want to buy what he has to offer. But he’s also building suspense. He knows the audience will want the information he’s providing, but by asking the questions he increases their anticipation of its value.

Deliver what you’ve promised

As long as there is audience anticipation there is attention. But of course, anticipation by itself is not enough; you must follow through and deliver the value you’ve promised. That’s simply part of the bargain. And it’s important that you do that in a logical order and build on each previous point, then sum up at the end and do a brief review of each of the points.

Deepen understanding and acceptance

By reviewing at the end you will deepen your audience’s understanding and acceptance of what you’re telling them. Repetition drives your message home. That’s why we keep seeing the same commercials over and over again on TV. I’ve talked about repetition here before http://www.sayitwithpower.ca/public-speaking/repetition-adds-power and I’m repeating it for one good reason: repetition adds power. Obviously, you don’t want to overdo it but if your presentation is focused and balanced, using devices like promising value and following through on delivery will strengthen your message and help your audience to retain it.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Maintain control and attention

I watched a speaker use a very interesting public speaking technique today to maintain control of her audience. She was speaking about web development and there was someone in the audience who was also a web developer who knew as much as she did and maybe more.

A very simple technique

There were a number of questions during her presentation, as training people about web development can be complex. From time to time the expert in the audience would add his comment to her answers or would answer the question himself. He was trying to add value but his action drew focus and attention away from the primary public speaker. And to her credit the speaker held control of the room using a very, very simple technique.

She rephrased his words

She simply waited for the other expert to finish his explanation of the point and then she rephrased it in her own words. Now the interesting thing that happens here is that the audience member provided the information but in the audience’s mind, the final answer came from the presenter, not the person who provided the original information.

Own the room

I’ve always maintained that a speaker must ‘own the room’ both for her own sake and the audience’s. After all, the audience came to hear information from the person who is speaking, not from the audience members. That doesn’t mean I discourage speakers from allowing audience members to make comments. In fact I support that a hundred percent, because an interactive audience is a more attentive audience.

You are the expert

When you have a situation where someone is providing information during your presentation, training yourself to re-phrase his or her comments will help you keep control of your audience.  The audience will then associate that information with you because you were the last person they heard it from.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Careful what you say online

I recently read a blog post in which the blogger trashed a former employer, venting a personal perspective of the organization’s internal politics. I was surprised that someone would jeopardize himself that much for the sake of putting his opinions and resentment in print. Come to think about it, the comments weren’t in print; they were on the internet, which made them all the more risky. But people say things on the internet that they’d never say if they were public speaking or putting those words in print.

Words can haunt you

I’m always very careful of what I say on the internet because it can literally be circulated globally to millions of readers at the speed of light. I’ve only written – and sent – one e-mail in anger; it came back to haunt me. But that’s not the reason I refrain from making scurrilous comments about individuals – and especially about large corporations. It’s about a very small word that can have very big consequences. A little thing lawyers call “libel”. Public speakers and writers are constantly vigilant about protecting themselves from libel charges but the average person never thinks about it. And many think that when they’re online they’re anonymous and invincible.

Keep it safe

Sometimes I think I’m just being paranoid, but I stick to my policy of playing it safe. When I was a journalist I said whatever I could prove about whoever deserved it. And I didn’t worry about it because I didn’t have to. My employers had lawyers and they could fight it out if they wanted to.

Watch what you say

But if you’re just a blogger you probably can’t afford a lawyer, nor the time and energy a lawsuit can wrench out of you. It’s much easier and safer to watch what you say anywhere online. We tend to think that freedom of speech and the anonymity of the internet will protect us, no matter what we say. Not true. While it’s true that you can say what you like, it’s also true that people can protect themselves with lawsuits – even if what you’re saying is true. And as far as anonymity on the internet is concerned, it’s a myth. You can be tracked down very easily.

The issue is everywhere

When I started this post I intended to refer you to an item published last month in the Los Angeles Times to illustrate my point: http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-blogger-suits-20100823,0,5604043.story. I thought it told the story well but I was concerned that people in the Toronto area, where I do most of my business, might think it was far away and somehow less relevant to them. But as I read my Toronto Globe and Mail last night I came across another article http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/toronto/sex-lies-and-videotape-shape-debate-on-online-defamation-law/article1712933 that brought the issue right home to Toronto.

Be very careful

The article makes the point that most people who have no experience with publishing are not aware of libel and defamation laws. But when writing is your job, you learn very quickly that people respond to what you say – and it isn’t always positive. And you learn to be very, very careful. If you’re new to publishing – and even a blog post that you think will only be viewed by friends and relatives – or even an Facebook comment – is publishing. Please be careful. What you say could cost you dearly.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Coopetition can be profitable

One of the things you may want to consider to help get through tough times or any times is co-operating with others in your market niche more than you compete with them.  Sometimes, contrary to what we may think, if we join forces with people who provide similar services to our own, we can increase market reach and broaden service offerings to everyone’s benefit.  And that can be better than trying to go it alone.

Common sense rules

Now, I’m not suggesting that you get in bed with someone who keeps knives under the pillow, nor that you share your client lists and trade secrets.  Obviously, common sense has to rule.  But there’s absolutely no doubt in my mind that, properly executed, particularly in times like these, co-operation can be as healthy – or even healthier – to a business than competition.  This is a time-honoured practice in many large corporations, where it’s referred to as co-opetition, and it’s a concept I like very much.

How this can work

Let me give you an example of how this can work.  I’ve known Helen and Keith, a marketing duo, for about six years now and while we’ve talked about working together in the past we’ve never actually pursued the idea.  That is, until we had a very propitious conversation last November.  That’s when I suggested that if they ever had clients who required presentation or media training I’d be happy to help them out.  In return, if I had clients whose needs exceeded my resources, I’d contact them. Keith smiled.  “As a matter of fact, I have a client who could use some media training.  We don’t really get into that, so I’ll have him contact you.”

Everyone’s a winner

A few days later I was hired for a half-day media training session and that session has led to more training and writing assignments.  And I expect my work with this client to continue for some time.  I’m happy, the client’s happy and Keith and Helen are happy because it reflects well on them.  Everyone’s a winner and Keith, Helen and I are keeping our eyes open for other areas where we can increase value to clients by working together.  It makes sense – and it’s profitable.

A few ground rules

I should point out here that we established a few ground rules before we began.  First, we agreed on a finder’s fee that ensures that whoever brings in the business is adequately rewarded.  Then we agreed we would continue to operate as independent consultants on this and future projects unless it made more sense for one of us to report to the other.  We also agreed not to encroach on service offerings that were already being provided by the other party.  I think we have a pretty good understanding of who does what and under what circumstances.  And of course, we’re both open to discussing modifications to suit new situations that may present themselves.

Don’t struggle

I know partnering, particularly with competitors, can be fraught with pitfalls.  Been there; done that.  But let’s face it, we all have areas where we excel and others where we have to struggle to meet client needs.  And one thing I’ve learned over the years is don’t struggle if you don’t have to.  It consumes valuable time and energy – and can cost you a client.

Open yourself to possibilities

It makes more sense to contact someone who does similar work to what you do and share the contract with that person rather than trying to do it all yourself. And it makes even more sense to align yourself in advance with several of your colleagues to invite them to join you in some healthy co-opetition on an ongoing basis.  You don’t have to give up your independence.  You don’t have to invest any cash.  You don’t have to share any secrets.  You just need to open yourself to some possibilities.

It makes sense

It’s not a cure-all but it makes sense to me, particularly in tough times, to look for alliances that promote both parties.  It’s been profitable for me and I recommend that you consider it as well.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.

Repetition adds power

As difficult as it can be get up and share information with an audience, it can be more difficult to get them to retain what you’re saying. A good way around that is to use simple repetition.

Remember Obama?

If you think back to the Obama campaign in 2008, you’ll automatically think of Obama’s tag line “Yes, we can!” With those three simple words, Obama captured the imagination of the American people and he repeated them hundreds of times during the campaign.

I want people to remember

You’ll see lesser known speakers do the same thing. For example, if you came to one of my presentation training workshops, you’d hear me talking about relaxing and providing value. And you wouldn’t hear these phrases just once you’d hear them several times throughout the public speaking training session. That’s because I believe in them and because I want people to remember those messages from my presentation training course.

Drive your message home

Let’s face it, when you do a 45-minute public presentation no one is going to remember everything. And they’ll even forget those parts of the speech that are most important to them if you don’t repeat them. So no matter what you do in other circumstances don’t hesitate to repeat yourself when you’re doing a presentation. Training yourself to do that and making it a natural part of your presentation will help to drive your message home.

Need a guest speaker?

If your group needs a skilled guest speaker or workshop leader, I’d like to help you. I provide a range of communications key note presentations and workshops. Please visit the presentations and workshops pages of this website and contact me to discuss how I can help you.

Need a presentation trainer?

Would you like help dealing with public speaking training and other communications issues? If so, please contact me to discuss my public speaking training programs. I provide one-on-one presentation training and group public speaking training sessions that provide tools to develop your public speaking skills. Contact me today!

About Thomas Moss

Thomas Moss is a speaker, writer and coach who provides business communications services, primarily in the Greater Toronto Area, including Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering, Markham, Richmond Hill, Newmarket, Vaughan, Brampton and Mississauga. Service is also available outside of the GTA.